fatbase

portable OpenBSD tools
git clone git://git.2f30.org/fatbase.git
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commit 2795390efdf0781bff7d8f3cf5980ab198e6e1fa
parent 333f1304257cc023a1429b52e54fb942083a8472
Author: sin <sin@2f30.org>
Date:   Tue Nov 18 15:56:50 +0000

Remove files

Diffstat:
sed/POSIX | 199-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
sed/TEST/hanoi.sed | 103-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
sed/TEST/math.sed | 164-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
sed/TEST/sed.test | 549-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
sed/TODO | 1-
5 files changed, 0 insertions(+), 1016 deletions(-)
diff --git a/sed/POSIX b/sed/POSIX @@ -1,199 +0,0 @@ -# $OpenBSD: POSIX,v 1.2 1996/06/26 05:39:04 deraadt Exp $ -# from: @(#)POSIX 8.1 (Berkeley) 6/6/93 - -Comments on the IEEE P1003.2 Draft 12 - Part 2: Shell and Utilities - Section 4.55: sed - Stream editor - -Diomidis Spinellis <dds@doc.ic.ac.uk> -Keith Bostic <bostic@cs.berkeley.edu> - -In the following paragraphs, "wrong" usually means "inconsistent with -historic practice", as most of the following comments refer to -undocumented inconsistencies between the historical versions of sed and -the POSIX 1003.2 standard. All the comments are notes taken while -implementing a POSIX-compatible version of sed, and should not be -interpreted as official opinions or criticism towards the POSIX committee. -All uses of "POSIX" refer to section 4.55, Draft 12 of POSIX 1003.2. - - 1. 32V and BSD derived implementations of sed strip the text - arguments of the a, c and i commands of their initial blanks, - i.e. - - #!/bin/sed -f - a\ - foo\ - \ indent\ - bar - - produces: - - foo - indent - bar - - POSIX does not specify this behavior as the System V versions of - sed do not do this stripping. The argument against stripping is - that it is difficult to write sed scripts that have leading blanks - if they are stripped. The argument for stripping is that it is - difficult to write readable sed scripts unless indentation is allowed - and ignored, and leading whitespace is obtainable by entering a - backslash in front of it. This implementation follows the BSD - historic practice. - - 2. Historical versions of sed required that the w flag be the last - flag to an s command as it takes an additional argument. This - is obvious, but not specified in POSIX. - - 3. Historical versions of sed required that whitespace follow a w - flag to an s command. This is not specified in POSIX. This - implementation permits whitespace but does not require it. - - 4. Historical versions of sed permitted any number of whitespace - characters to follow the w command. This is not specified in - POSIX. This implementation permits whitespace but does not - require it. - - 5. The rule for the l command differs from historic practice. Table - 2-15 includes the various ANSI C escape sequences, including \\ - for backslash. Some historical versions of sed displayed two - digit octal numbers, too, not three as specified by POSIX. POSIX - is a cleanup, and is followed by this implementation. - - 6. The POSIX specification for ! does not specify that for a single - command the command must not contain an address specification - whereas the command list can contain address specifications. The - specification for ! implies that "3!/hello/p" works, and it never - has, historically. Note, - - 3!{ - /hello/p - } - - does work. - - 7. POSIX does not specify what happens with consecutive ! commands - (e.g. /foo/!!!p). Historic implementations allow any number of - !'s without changing the behaviour. (It seems logical that each - one might reverse the behaviour.) This implementation follows - historic practice. - - 8. Historic versions of sed permitted commands to be separated - by semi-colons, e.g. 'sed -ne '1p;2p;3q' printed the first - three lines of a file. This is not specified by POSIX. - Note, the ; command separator is not allowed for the commands - a, c, i, w, r, :, b, t, # and at the end of a w flag in the s - command. This implementation follows historic practice and - implements the ; separator. - - 9. Historic versions of sed terminated the script if EOF was reached - during the execution of the 'n' command, i.e.: - - sed -e ' - n - i\ - hello - ' </dev/null - - did not produce any output. POSIX does not specify this behavior. - This implementation follows historic practice. - -10. Deleted. - -11. Historical implementations do not output the change text of a c - command in the case of an address range whose first line number - is greater than the second (e.g. 3,1). POSIX requires that the - text be output. Since the historic behavior doesn't seem to have - any particular purpose, this implementation follows the POSIX - behavior. - -12. POSIX does not specify whether address ranges are checked and - reset if a command is not executed due to a jump. The following - program will behave in different ways depending on whether the - 'c' command is triggered at the third line, i.e. will the text - be output even though line 3 of the input will never logically - encounter that command. - - 2,4b - 1,3c\ - text - - Historic implementations, and this implementation, do not output - the text in the above example. The general rule, therefore, - is that a range whose second address is never matched extends to - the end of the input. - -13. Historical implementations allow an output suppressing #n at the - beginning of -e arguments as well as in a script file. POSIX - does not specify this. This implementation follows historical - practice. - -14. POSIX does not explicitly specify how sed behaves if no script is - specified. Since the sed Synopsis permits this form of the command, - and the language in the Description section states that the input - is output, it seems reasonable that it behave like the cat(1) - command. Historic sed implementations behave differently for "ls | - sed", where they produce no output, and "ls | sed -e#", where they - behave like cat. This implementation behaves like cat in both cases. - -15. The POSIX requirement to open all w files at the beginning makes - sed behave nonintuitively when the w commands are preceded by - addresses or are within conditional blocks. This implementation - follows historic practice and POSIX, by default, and provides the - -a option which opens the files only when they are needed. - -16. POSIX does not specify how escape sequences other than \n and \D - (where D is the delimiter character) are to be treated. This is - reasonable, however, it also doesn't state that the backslash is - to be discarded from the output regardless. A strict reading of - POSIX would be that "echo xyz | sed s/./\a" would display "\ayz". - As historic sed implementations always discarded the backslash, - this implementation does as well. - -17. POSIX specifies that an address can be "empty". This implies - that constructs like ",d" or "1,d" and ",5d" are allowed. This - is not true for historic implementations or this implementation - of sed. - -18. The b t and : commands are documented in POSIX to ignore leading - white space, but no mention is made of trailing white space. - Historic implementations of sed assigned different locations to - the labels "x" and "x ". This is not useful, and leads to subtle - programming errors, but it is historic practice and changing it - could theoretically break working scripts. This implementation - follows historic practice. - -19. Although POSIX specifies that reading from files that do not exist - from within the script must not terminate the script, it does not - specify what happens if a write command fails. Historic practice - is to fail immediately if the file cannot be opened or written. - This implementation follows historic practice. - -20. Historic practice is that the \n construct can be used for either - string1 or string2 of the y command. This is not specified by - POSIX. This implementation follows historic practice. - -21. Deleted. - -22. Historic implementations of sed ignore the RE delimiter characters - within character classes. This is not specified in POSIX. This - implementation follows historic practice. - -23. Historic implementations handle empty RE's in a special way: the - empty RE is interpreted as if it were the last RE encountered, - whether in an address or elsewhere. POSIX does not document this - behavior. For example the command: - - sed -e /abc/s//XXX/ - - substitutes XXX for the pattern abc. The semantics of "the last - RE" can be defined in two different ways: - - 1. The last RE encountered when compiling (lexical/static scope). - 2. The last RE encountered while running (dynamic scope). - - While many historical implementations fail on programs depending - on scope differences, the SunOS version exhibited dynamic scope - behaviour. This implementation does dynamic scoping, as this seems - the most useful and in order to remain consistent with historical - practice. diff --git a/sed/TEST/hanoi.sed b/sed/TEST/hanoi.sed @@ -1,103 +0,0 @@ -# $OpenBSD: hanoi.sed,v 1.2 1996/06/26 05:39:09 deraadt Exp $ -# Towers of Hanoi in sed. -# -# from: @(#)hanoi.sed 8.1 (Berkeley) 6/6/93 -# -# -# Ex: -# Run "sed -f hanoi.sed", and enter: -# -# :abcd: : :<CR><CR> -# -# note -- TWO carriage returns, a peculiarity of sed), this will output the -# sequence of states involved in moving 4 rings, the largest called "a" and -# the smallest called "d", from the first to the second of three towers, so -# that the rings on any tower at any time are in descending order of size. -# You can start with a different arrangement and a different number of rings, -# say :ce:b:ax: and it will give the shortest procedure for moving them all -# to the middle tower. The rules are: the names of the rings must all be -# lower-case letters, they must be input within 3 fields (representing the -# towers) and delimited by 4 colons, such that the letters within each field -# are in alphabetical order (i.e. rings are in descending order of size). -# -# For the benefit of anyone who wants to figure out the script, an "internal" -# line of the form -# b:0abx:1a2b3 :2 :3x2 -# has the following meaning: the material after the three markers :1, :2, -# and :3 represents the three towers; in this case the current set-up is -# ":ab : :x :". The numbers after a, b and x in these fields indicate -# that the next time it gets a chance, it will move a to tower 2, move b -# to tower 3, and move x to tower 2. The string after :0 just keeps track -# of the alphabetical order of the names of the rings. The b at the -# beginning means that it is now dealing with ring b (either about to move -# it, or re-evaluating where it should next be moved to). -# -# Although this version is "limited" to 26 rings because of the size of the -# alphabet, one could write a script using the same idea in which the rings -# were represented by arbitrary [strings][within][brackets], and in place of -# the built-in line of the script giving the order of the letters of the -# alphabet, it would accept from the user a line giving the ordering to be -# assumed, e.g. [ucbvax][decvax][hplabs][foo][bar]. -# -# George Bergman -# Math, UC Berkeley 94720 USA - -# cleaning, diagnostics -s/ *//g -/^$/d -/[^a-z:]/{a\ -Illegal characters: use only a-z and ":". Try again. -d -} -/^:[a-z]*:[a-z]*:[a-z]*:$/!{a\ -Incorrect format: use\ -\ : string1 : string2 : string3 :<CR><CR>\ -Try again. -d -} -/\([a-z]\).*\1/{a\ -Repeated letters not allowed. Try again. -d -} -# initial formatting -h -s/[a-z]/ /g -G -s/^:\( *\):\( *\):\( *\):\n:\([a-z]*\):\([a-z]*\):\([a-z]*\):$/:1\4\2\3:2\5\1\3:3\6\1\2:0/ -s/[a-z]/&2/g -s/^/abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz/ -:a -s/^\(.\).*\1.*/&\1/ -s/.// -/^[^:]/ba -s/\([^0]*\)\(:0.*\)/\2\1:/ -s/^[^0]*0\(.\)/\1&/ -:b -# outputting current state without markers -h -s/.*:1/:/ -s/[123]//gp -g -:c -# establishing destinations -/^\(.\).*\1:1/td -/^\(.\).*:1[^:]*\11/s/^\(.\)\(.*\1\([a-z]\).*\)\3./\3\2\31/ -/^\(.\).*:1[^:]*\12/s/^\(.\)\(.*\1\([a-z]\).*\)\3./\3\2\33/ -/^\(.\).*:1[^:]*\13/s/^\(.\)\(.*\1\([a-z]\).*\)\3./\3\2\32/ -/^\(.\).*:2[^:]*\11/s/^\(.\)\(.*\1\([a-z]\).*\)\3./\3\2\33/ -/^\(.\).*:2[^:]*\12/s/^\(.\)\(.*\1\([a-z]\).*\)\3./\3\2\32/ -/^\(.\).*:2[^:]*\13/s/^\(.\)\(.*\1\([a-z]\).*\)\3./\3\2\31/ -/^\(.\).*:3[^:]*\11/s/^\(.\)\(.*\1\([a-z]\).*\)\3./\3\2\32/ -/^\(.\).*:3[^:]*\12/s/^\(.\)\(.*\1\([a-z]\).*\)\3./\3\2\31/ -/^\(.\).*:3[^:]*\13/s/^\(.\)\(.*\1\([a-z]\).*\)\3./\3\2\33/ -bc -# iterate back to find smallest out-of-place ring -:d -s/^\(.\)\(:0[^:]*\([^:]\)\1.*:\([123]\)[^:]*\1\)\4/\3\2\4/ -td -# move said ring (right, resp. left) -s/^\(.\)\(.*\)\1\([23]\)\(.*:\3[^ ]*\) /\1\2 \4\1\3/ -s/^\(.\)\(.*:\([12]\)[^ ]*\) \(.*\)\1\3/\1\2\1\3\4 / -tb -s/.*/Done! Try another, or end with ^D./p -d diff --git a/sed/TEST/math.sed b/sed/TEST/math.sed @@ -1,164 +0,0 @@ -# $OpenBSD: math.sed,v 1.2 1996/06/26 05:39:10 deraadt Exp $ -# -# from: @(#)math.sed 8.1 (Berkeley) 6/6/93 -# -# Addition and multiplication in sed. -# ++ for a limited time only do (expr) too!!! -# -# Kevin S Braunsdorf, PUCC UNIX Group, ksb@cc.purdue.edu. -# -# Ex: -# echo "4+7*3" | sed -f %f - -# make sure the expression is well formed -s/[ ]//g -/[+*\/-]$/{ - a\ - poorly formed expression, operator on the end - q -} -/^[+*\/]/{ - a\ - poorly formed expression, leading operator - q -} - -# fill hold space with done token -x -s/^.*/done/ -x - -# main loop, process operators (*, + and () ) -: loop -/^\+/{ - s/// - b loop -} -/^\(.*\)(\([^)]*\))\(.*\)$/{ - H - s//\2/ - x - s/^\(.*\)\n\(.*\)(\([^()]*\))\(.*\)$/()\2@\4@\1/ - x - b loop -} -/^[0-9]*\*/b mul -/^\([0-9]*\)\+\([0-9+*]*\*[0-9]*\)$/{ - s//\2+\1/ - b loop -} -/^[0-9]*\+/{ - s/$/=/ - b add -} -x -/^done$/{ - x - p - d -} -/^()/{ - s/// - x - G - s/\(.*\)\n\([^@]*\)@\([^@]*\)@\(.*\)/\2\1\3/ - x - s/[^@]*@[^@]*@\(.*\)/\1/ - x - b loop -} -i\ -help, stack problem -p -x -p -q - -# turn mul into add until 1*x -> x -: mul -/^0*1\*/{ - s/// - b loop -} -/^\([0-9]*\)0\*/{ - s/^\([0-9]*\)0\*\([0-9]*\)/\1*\20/ - b mul -} -s/^\([0-9]*\)1\*/\10*/ -s/^\([0-9]*\)2\*/\11*/ -s/^\([0-9]*\)3\*/\12*/ -s/^\([0-9]*\)4\*/\13*/ -s/^\([0-9]*\)5\*/\14*/ -s/^\([0-9]*\)6\*/\15*/ -s/^\([0-9]*\)7\*/\16*/ -s/^\([0-9]*\)8\*/\17*/ -s/^\([0-9]*\)9\*/\18*/ -s/\*\([0-9*]*\)/*\1+\1/ -b mul - -# get rid of a plus term until 0+x -> x -: add -/^\+\([0-9+*]*\)=/{ - s//\1/ - b loop -} -/^\([0-9*]*\)\+=/{ - s//\1/ - b loop -} -/^\([0-9]*\)\+\([0-9*+]*\)\+=/{ - s//\2+\1/ - b loop -} -/^\([0-9]*\)0\+\([0-9]*\)\([0-9]\)=/{ - s//\1+\2=\3/ - b add -} -/^\([0-9]*\)\([0-9]\)\+\([0-9]*\)0=/{ - s//\1+\3=\2/ - b add -} -/^\([0-9]*\)0\+\([0-9*+]*\)\+\([0-9]*\)\([0-9]\)=/{ - s//\1+\2+\3=\4/ - b add -} -/^\([0-9]*\)\([0-9]\)\+\([0-9*+]*\)\+\([0-9]*\)0=/{ - s//\1+\3+\4=\2/ - b add -} -s/^\([0-9]*\)1\+/\10+/ -s/^\([0-9]*\)2\+/\11+/ -s/^\([0-9]*\)3\+/\12+/ -s/^\([0-9]*\)4\+/\13+/ -s/^\([0-9]*\)5\+/\14+/ -s/^\([0-9]*\)6\+/\15+/ -s/^\([0-9]*\)7\+/\16+/ -s/^\([0-9]*\)8\+/\17+/ -s/^\([0-9]*\)9\+/\18+/ - -s/9=\([0-9]*\)$/_=\1/ -s/8=\([0-9]*\)$/9=\1/ -s/7=\([0-9]*\)$/8=\1/ -s/6=\([0-9]*\)$/7=\1/ -s/5=\([0-9]*\)$/6=\1/ -s/4=\([0-9]*\)$/5=\1/ -s/3=\([0-9]*\)$/4=\1/ -s/2=\([0-9]*\)$/3=\1/ -s/1=\([0-9]*\)$/2=\1/ -/_/{ - s//_0/ - : inc - s/9_/_0/ - s/8_/9/ - s/7_/8/ - s/6_/7/ - s/5_/6/ - s/4_/5/ - s/3_/4/ - s/2_/3/ - s/1_/2/ - s/0_/1/ - s/\+_/+1/ - /_/b inc -} -b add diff --git a/sed/TEST/sed.test b/sed/TEST/sed.test @@ -1,549 +0,0 @@ -#!/bin/sh - -# $OpenBSD: sed.test,v 1.4 2008/10/07 15:02:45 millert Exp $ -# -# Copyright (c) 1992 Diomidis Spinellis. -# Copyright (c) 1992, 1993 -# The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved. -# -# Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without -# modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions -# are met: -# 1. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright -# notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer. -# 2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright -# notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the -# documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution. -# 3. Neither the name of the University nor the names of its contributors -# may be used to endorse or promote products derived from this software -# without specific prior written permission. -# -# THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE REGENTS AND CONTRIBUTORS ``AS IS'' AND -# ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE -# IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE -# ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE REGENTS OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE -# FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL -# DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS -# OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) -# HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT -# LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY -# OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF -# SUCH DAMAGE. -# -# from: @(#)sed.test 8.1 (Berkeley) 6/6/93 -# - -# sed Regression Tests -# -# The following files are created: -# lines[1-4], script1, script2 -# Two directories *.out contain the test results - -main() -{ - BASE=/usr/bin/sed - BASELOG=sed.out - TEST=./sed - TESTLOG=nsed.out - DICT=/usr/share/dict/words - - test_error | more - - awk 'END { for (i = 1; i < 15; i++) print "l1_" i}' </dev/null >lines1 - awk 'END { for (i = 1; i < 10; i++) print "l2_" i}' </dev/null >lines2 - - exec 4>&1 5>&2 - - # Set these flags to get messages about known problems - BSD=0 - GNU=0 - SUN=0 - tests $BASE $BASELOG - - BSD=0 - GNU=0 - SUN=0 - tests $TEST $TESTLOG - exec 1>&4 2>&5 - diff $BASELOG $TESTLOG | less -} - -tests() -{ - SED=$1 - DIR=$2 - rm -rf $DIR - mkdir $DIR - MARK=100 - - test_args - test_addr - echo Testing commands - test_group - test_acid - test_branch - test_pattern - test_print - test_subst -} - -mark() -{ - MARK=`expr $MARK + 1` - exec 1>&4 2>&5 - exec >"$DIR/${MARK}_$1" - echo "Test $1:$MARK" - # Uncomment this line to match tests with sed error messages - echo "Test $1:$MARK" >&5 -} - -test_args() -{ - mark '1.1' - echo Testing argument parsing - echo First type - if [ $SUN -eq 1 ] ; then - echo SunOS sed prints only with -n - else - $SED 's/^/e1_/p' lines1 - fi - mark '1.2' ; $SED -n 's/^/e1_/p' lines1 - mark '1.3' - if [ $SUN -eq 1 ] ; then - echo SunOS sed prints only with -n - else - $SED 's/^/e1_/p' <lines1 - fi - mark '1.4' ; $SED -n 's/^/e1_/p' <lines1 - echo Second type - mark '1.4.1' - if [ $SUN -eq 1 ] ; then - echo SunOS sed fails this - fi - $SED -e '' <lines1 - echo 's/^/s1_/p' >script1 - echo 's/^/s2_/p' >script2 - mark '1.5' - if [ $SUN -eq 1 ] ; then - echo SunOS sed prints only with -n - else - $SED -f script1 lines1 - fi - mark '1.6' - if [ $SUN -eq 1 ] ; then - echo SunOS sed prints only with -n - else - $SED -f script1 <lines1 - fi - mark '1.7' - if [ $SUN -eq 1 ] ; then - echo SunOS sed prints only with -n - else - $SED -e 's/^/e1_/p' lines1 - fi - mark '1.8' - if [ $SUN -eq 1 ] ; then - echo SunOS sed prints only with -n - else - $SED -e 's/^/e1_/p' <lines1 - fi - mark '1.9' ; $SED -n -f script1 lines1 - mark '1.10' ; $SED -n -f script1 <lines1 - mark '1.11' ; $SED -n -e 's/^/e1_/p' lines1 - mark '1.12' - if [ $SUN -eq 1 ] ; then - echo SunOS sed prints only with -n - else - $SED -n -e 's/^/e1_/p' <lines1 - fi - mark '1.13' - if [ $SUN -eq 1 ] ; then - echo SunOS sed prints only with -n - else - $SED -e 's/^/e1_/p' -e 's/^/e2_/p' lines1 - fi - mark '1.14' - if [ $SUN -eq 1 ] ; then - echo SunOS sed prints only with -n - else - $SED -f script1 -f script2 lines1 - fi - mark '1.15' - if [ $GNU -eq 1 -o $SUN -eq 1 ] ; then - echo GNU and SunOS sed fail this following older POSIX draft - else - $SED -e 's/^/e1_/p' -f script1 lines1 - fi - mark '1.16' - if [ $SUN -eq 1 ] ; then - echo SunOS sed prints only with -n - else - $SED -e 's/^/e1_/p' lines1 lines1 - fi - # POSIX D11.2:11251 - mark '1.17' ; $SED p <lines1 lines1 -cat >script1 <<EOF -#n -# A comment - -p -EOF - mark '1.18' ; $SED -f script1 <lines1 lines1 -} - -test_addr() -{ - echo Testing address ranges - mark '2.1' ; $SED -n -e '4p' lines1 - mark '2.2' ; $SED -n -e '20p' lines1 lines2 - mark '2.3' ; $SED -n -e '$p' lines1 - mark '2.4' ; $SED -n -e '$p' lines1 lines2 - mark '2.5' ; $SED -n -e '$a\ -hello' /dev/null - mark '2.6' ; $SED -n -e '$p' lines1 /dev/null lines2 - # Should not print anything - mark '2.7' ; $SED -n -e '20p' lines1 - mark '2.8' ; $SED -n -e '0p' lines1 - mark '2.9' ; $SED -n '/l1_7/p' lines1 - mark '2.10' ; $SED -n ' /l1_7/ p' lines1 - mark '2.11' - if [ $BSD -eq 1 ] ; then - echo BSD sed fails this test - fi - if [ $GNU -eq 1 ] ; then - echo GNU sed fails this - fi - $SED -n '\_l1\_7_p' lines1 - mark '2.12' ; $SED -n '1,4p' lines1 - mark '2.13' ; $SED -n '1,$p' lines1 lines2 - mark '2.14' ; $SED -n '1,/l2_9/p' lines1 lines2 - mark '2.15' ; $SED -n '/4/,$p' lines1 lines2 - mark '2.16' ; $SED -n '/4/,20p' lines1 lines2 - mark '2.17' ; $SED -n '/4/,/10/p' lines1 lines2 - mark '2.18' ; $SED -n '/l2_3/,/l1_8/p' lines1 lines2 - mark '2.19' - if [ $GNU -eq 1 ] ; then - echo GNU sed fails this - fi - $SED -n '12,3p' lines1 lines2 - mark '2.20' - if [ $GNU -eq 1 ] ; then - echo GNU sed fails this - fi - $SED -n '/l1_7/,3p' lines1 lines2 -} - -test_group() -{ - echo Brace and other grouping - mark '3.1' ; $SED -e ' -4,12 { - s/^/^/ - s/$/$/ - s/_/T/ -}' lines1 - mark '3.2' ; $SED -e ' -4,12 { - s/^/^/ - /6/,/10/ { - s/$/$/ - /8/ s/_/T/ - } -}' lines1 - mark '3.3' ; $SED -e ' -4,12 !{ - s/^/^/ - /6/,/10/ !{ - s/$/$/ - /8/ !s/_/T/ - } -}' lines1 - mark '3.4' ; $SED -e '4,12!s/^/^/' lines1 -} - -test_acid() -{ - echo Testing a c d and i commands - mark '4.1' ; $SED -n -e ' -s/^/before_i/p -20i\ -inserted -s/^/after_i/p -' lines1 lines2 - mark '4.2' ; $SED -n -e ' -5,12s/^/5-12/ -s/^/before_a/p -/5-12/a\ -appended -s/^/after_a/p -' lines1 lines2 - mark '4.3' - if [ $GNU -eq 1 ] ; then - echo GNU sed fails this - fi - $SED -n -e ' -s/^/^/p -/l1_/a\ -appended -8,10N -s/$/$/p -' lines1 lines2 - mark '4.4' ; $SED -n -e ' -c\ -hello -' lines1 - mark '4.5' ; $SED -n -e ' -8c\ -hello -' lines1 - mark '4.6' ; $SED -n -e ' -3,14c\ -hello -' lines1 -# SunOS and GNU sed behave differently. We follow POSIX -# mark '4.7' ; $SED -n -e ' -#8,3c\ -#hello -#' lines1 - mark '4.8' ; $SED d <lines1 -} - -test_branch() -{ - echo Testing labels and branching - mark '5.1' ; $SED -n -e ' -b label4 -:label3 -s/^/label3_/p -b end -:label4 -2,12b label1 -b label2 -:label1 -s/^/label1_/p -b -:label2 -s/^/label2_/p -b label3 -:end -' lines1 - mark '5.2' - if [ $BSD -eq 1 ] ; then - echo BSD sed fails this test - fi - $SED -n -e ' -s/l1_/l2_/ -t ok -b -:ok -s/^/tested /p -' lines1 lines2 -# SunOS sed behaves differently here. Clarification needed. -# mark '5.3' ; $SED -n -e ' -#5,8b inside -#1,5 { -# s/^/^/p -# :inside -# s/$/$/p -#} -#' lines1 -# Check that t clears the substitution done flag - mark '5.4' ; $SED -n -e ' -1,8s/^/^/ -t l1 -:l1 -t l2 -s/$/$/p -b -:l2 -s/^/ERROR/ -' lines1 -# Check that reading a line clears the substitution done flag - mark '5.5' - if [ $BSD -eq 1 ] ; then - echo BSD sed fails this test - fi - $SED -n -e ' -t l2 -1,8s/^/^/p -2,7N -b -:l2 -s/^/ERROR/p -' lines1 - mark '5.6' ; $SED 5q lines1 - mark '5.7' ; $SED -e ' -5i\ -hello -5q' lines1 -# Branch across block boundary - mark '5.8' ; $SED -e ' -{ -:b -} -s/l/m/ -tb' lines1 -} - -test_pattern() -{ -echo Pattern space commands -# Check that the pattern space is deleted - mark '6.1' ; $SED -n -e ' -c\ -changed -p -' lines1 - mark '6.2' ; $SED -n -e ' -4d -p -' lines1 -# SunOS sed refused to print here -# mark '6.3' ; $SED -e ' -#N -#N -#N -#D -#P -#4p -#' lines1 - mark '6.4' ; $SED -e ' -2h -3H -4g -5G -6x -6p -6x -6p -' lines1 - mark '6.5' ; $SED -e '4n' lines1 - mark '6.6' ; $SED -n -e '4n' lines1 -} - -test_print() -{ - echo Testing print and file routines - awk 'END {for (i = 1; i < 256; i++) printf("%c", i);print "\n"}' \ - </dev/null >lines3 - # GNU and SunOS sed behave differently here - mark '7.1' - if [ $BSD -eq 1 ] ; then - echo 'BSD sed drops core on this one; TEST SKIPPED' - else - $SED -n l lines3 - fi - mark '7.2' ; $SED -e '/l2_/=' lines1 lines2 - rm -f lines4 - mark '7.3' ; $SED -e '3,12w lines4' lines1 - echo w results - cat lines4 - mark '7.4' ; $SED -e '4r lines2' lines1 - mark '7.5' ; $SED -e '5r /dev/dds' lines1 - mark '7.6' ; $SED -e '6r /dev/null' lines1 - mark '7.7' - if [ $BSD -eq 1 -o $GNU -eq 1 -o $SUN -eq 1 ] ; then - echo BSD, GNU and SunOS cannot pass this one - else - sed '200q' $DICT | sed 's$.*$s/^/&/w tmpdir/&$' >script1 - rm -rf tmpdir - mkdir tmpdir - $SED -f script1 lines1 - cat tmpdir/* - rm -rf tmpdir - fi - mark '7.8' - if [ $BSD -eq 1 ] ; then - echo BSD sed cannot pass 7.7 - else - echo line1 > lines3 - echo "" >> lines3 - $SED -n -e '$p' lines3 /dev/null - fi - -} - -test_subst() -{ - echo Testing substitution commands - mark '8.1' ; $SED -e 's/./X/g' lines1 - mark '8.2' ; $SED -e 's,.,X,g' lines1 -# GNU and SunOS sed thinks we are escaping . as wildcard, not as separator -# mark '8.3' ; $SED -e 's.\..X.g' lines1 -# POSIX does not say that this should work -# mark '8.4' ; $SED -e 's/[/]/Q/' lines1 - mark '8.4' ; $SED -e 's/[\/]/Q/' lines1 - mark '8.5' ; $SED -e 's_\__X_' lines1 - mark '8.6' ; $SED -e 's/./(&)/g' lines1 - mark '8.7' ; $SED -e 's/./(\&)/g' lines1 - mark '8.8' ; $SED -e 's/\(.\)\(.\)\(.\)/x\3x\2x\1/g' lines1 - mark '8.9' ; $SED -e 's/_/u0\ -u1\ -u2/g' lines1 - mark '8.10' - if [ $BSD -eq 1 -o $GNU -eq 1 ] ; then - echo 'BSD/GNU sed do not understand digit flags on s commands' - fi - $SED -e 's/./X/4' lines1 - rm -f lines4 - mark '8.11' ; $SED -e 's/1/X/w lines4' lines1 - echo s wfile results - cat lines4 - mark '8.12' ; $SED -e 's/[123]/X/g' lines1 - mark '8.13' ; $SED -e 'y/0123456789/9876543210/' lines1 - mark '8.14' ; - if [ $BSD -eq 1 -o $GNU -eq 1 -o $SUN -eq 1 ] ; then - echo BSD/GNU/SUN sed fail this test - else - $SED -e 'y10\123456789198765432\101' lines1 - fi - mark '8.15' ; $SED -e '1N;2y/\n/X/' lines1 - mark '8.16' - if [ $BSD -eq 1 ] ; then - echo 'BSD sed does not handle branch defined REs' - else - echo 'eeefff' | $SED -e 'p' -e 's/e/X/p' -e ':x' \ - -e 's//Y/p' -e '/f/bx' - fi -} - -test_error() -{ - exec 0>&3 4>&1 5>&2 - exec 0</dev/null - exec 2>&1 - set -x - $TEST -x && exit 1 - $TEST -f && exit 1 - $TEST -e && exit 1 - $TEST -f /dev/dds && exit 1 - $TEST p /dev/dds && exit 1 - $TEST -f /bin/sh && exit 1 - $TEST '{' && exit 1 - $TEST '{' && exit 1 - $TEST '/hello/' && exit 1 - $TEST '1,/hello/' && exit 1 - $TEST -e '-5p' && exit 1 - $TEST '/jj' && exit 1 - $TEST 'a hello' && exit 1 - $TEST 'a \ hello' && exit 1 - $TEST 'b foo' && exit 1 - $TEST 'd hello' && exit 1 - $TEST 's/aa' && exit 1 - $TEST 's/aa/' && exit 1 - $TEST 's/a/b' && exit 1 - $TEST 's/a/b/c/d' && exit 1 - $TEST 's/a/b/ 1 2' && exit 1 - $TEST 's/a/b/ 1 g' && exit 1 - $TEST 's/a/b/w' && exit 1 - $TEST 'y/aa' && exit 1 - $TEST 'y/aa/b/' && exit 1 - $TEST 'y/aa/' && exit 1 - $TEST 'y/a/b' && exit 1 - $TEST 'y/a/b/c/d' && exit 1 - $TEST '!' && exit 1 - $TEST supercalifrangolisticexprialidociussupercalifrangolisticexcius - set +x - exec 0>&3 1>&4 2>&5 -} - -main diff --git a/sed/TODO b/sed/TODO @@ -1 +0,0 @@ -workaround REG_STARTEND: http://www.polarhome.com/service/man/generic.php?qf=regex&tf=2&of=OpenBSD&sf=3